Saturday, September 14, 2013

September Apple Basket Block

 
This September Apple Picking Basket block is part of my Wooly Basket Calendar Quilt.  The pattern is from the Starry Pines Pattern Company: http://starrypinespatterncompany.com/spindex2.html

I used wool for the hand-appliqued basket, cotton flannel for the background fabric, and black perle cotton for the embroidery. 
 
I recently hosted my book club and served this Wassail Punch.  It was a foggy, rainy sort of day, so this hot cider was perfect!
 
Wassail Punch
2 quarts apple juice
4 cups orange juice
1/2 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup sugar
12 whole cloves
4 (3-4") cinnamon sticks
 
1.  Combine all ingredients in a large Dutch oven. 
2.  Bring to a boil. 
3.  Reduce heat and simmer for 10-15 minutes.
4.  Discard cloves and cinnamon sticks.  Serve warm.
 
I put all the ingredients except the cloves and cinnamon sticks in my crockpot before I went to work.  When I returned home four hours later, I added the cloves and cinnamon sticks and set it to high for a half hour before removing the spices.  I wanted my home to smell wonderful when my guests arrived, and it did!  If I had put the spices in at the beginning, they would overpower the punch.  
 
 
 
The world's largest apple peel was created by Kathy Wafler Madison on October 16, 1976 in Rochester, New York.  It was 172 feet, 4 inches long.  (She was 16 years old at the time and grew up to be a sales manager for an apple tree nursery.) 
 
 
What is your favorite type of eating apple?  Inquiring minds want to know! 
 
You might also enjoy reading my previous blog post here.

7 comments:

  1. I think "Fuji" is the most popular here in Japan. To me, they seem more works of art than fruit. My uncle had an apple orchard in Ohio with many varieties that were used for pies or apple sauce or cider or just plain eating. Some were early and some were late, so the season was long. I don't remember in those days, having to peal the apple but just ate it skin and all. When you buy an apple in Japan, you pay for very pretty but tough skin and a lot of extra TLC.

    ReplyDelete
  2. What a lovely pattern, thank you so much! We grew up on Cherry Street and had two cherry trees and one big apple tree...Mom made applesauce from it...the "swing set" was under the apple tree and some years there were more rotten ones on the ground, especially after a storm. This would not do for my parents, so we had to "pick" them up....I was at an age that needed lots of encouragement to start the job assigned...I was doing it but whining...my Dad (the saint, he raised 8 kids!) was in his "shop" (he was a paint contractor...he heard me....he came out and said....well, Karen, you can cry and be miserable doing your work, or you can choose to whistle while you work!...now let me hear you whistle.... I have never forgotten that lesson and did apply it and try to still apply it!!...it does work!!.....my fav at the market is the sweet Fuji but for pies and tarter things I would choose Johnathon and other dishes Winesap and Honey Crisp....Love apples!!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Fuji has always been my favorite eating apple, but I recently tried a Honey Crisp apple and really enjoyed its flavor.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Macintosh! The home we moved from a year and a half ago had a dwarf Macintosh that was divine. The new owners cut down ALL the fruit trees....2 apple, 1 pear, 1 tart cherry, 1 plum, and one peach. I was nauseous. Those trees produced such wonderful fruit.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Pink lady!! Sweet with just a touch of tartness and always very crispy...I hate mushy apples.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I have to comment here just to leave a smile for the picture of the apple dishes. :-)

    ReplyDelete
  7. The Wooly Basket Calendar Quilt is precious. I'm looking forward to some cooler days (eventually) in Texas so I can try the wassail recipe. I love apples & really don't have a favorite.

    ReplyDelete

I love hearing from readers. Your comments make my day!